Tips
   & Tricks 
Some Tips Seems Like Tricks, and Some Tricks ...

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Tip 1:  Tire rotation    [click here]
 
    My friends always recommended me to buy tires in trios.  The front tire last twice the mileage than the rear one.  Once the rear is gone, replace it with the reserve one, or better use the new for the front.   Another alternative is simply tire rotation at the first sign of tire wear.  If for any reason you have to change a tire or a tube, just use the opportunity to rotate your tires.  It’s a little cumbersome because it's no as easy as in cars, here you have to remove both tires.  This will make your tire set last longer.  But many people prefer always to use a new or the best tire in the front, because this is the one with more stoping power!


Tip 2:  Ice and Sport's Drink   [click here]
 

 
     This is one of the best tips I have found in cyberspace, and it's one of the more simple.  Don't you hate adding Ice to your water bottle witch later will dilute your Sport's Drink when it melts.  Well, make Ice with the Sport Drink.  Use some plastic cups as molds or use ice trays.  Just be sure that your Drink's blocks pass trough the mouth of the bottle or your hydration system (Camelback, Hidrapack, etc.).  

 
 

Tip 3:  Cold Water or Sport's Drink for a long time!   [click here]
 
 

    This one should work easier for a bottle.  The day before your trip, fill your bottle(s) halfway with whatever your drink (water, Gator, Power ... DonQ) and place them sideways in the freezer (eeehhh... please close the bottle cap first).  The next day just fill it up.  I had already tried it, and its work,  not better that the previous tip, but is a lot simple and less messy.

    Also some people fill 1/4 of their Camel/Hydra reserve, and then fill the rest with air.  You should be sure that the exit tube is not filled with liquid or you will spend several long minutes with a clogged reserve.  Fill the reserve up the next day.  My only concern here it's to damage the reserve who usually cost half of the full system.

 


Tip 4:  How to clean an Hydration system reserve that has a small mouth?   [click here]
 


   My hydration system is very easy to clean because the reserve has a large mouth and I can get my hand inside easily.  But old or less expensive models have a small mouth that makes the reserve difficult to clean.  Some people use rice (not cooked) as an abrasive.  They add water, detergent, rice (...to taste) and shake it baby (sorry I was carried away) until it’s clean! But the easiest and more efficient way to keep your reserve neat is to clean it and let it air dry it as soon as possible after each use!


 


Tip 5:  To disinfect your Hydration System!    [click here]
 


     If not knowing how clean is your reserve worries you; the use of Clorox is not always the best solution!  Several ounces of your favorite mouthwash will just do the trick.  Just remember to wash your reserve several times with water if you don’t want your Gator../Power.../water have a mint taste!


 


Tip 6:  How to make a rented bike feels like ours!   [click here]
 


 
     Where do you feel the difference between a rented bike and yours?  In the contact points:  Handlebar, pedals and saddles!  Of the trio, the handlebar is the most difficult to change.  You have to replace the grips, the shifters, the breaks, the bar ends.  I just want to see the face of the employee after you tell him that you want to change the pedals, saddle and then the handlebar!  Your own saddle makes you feel just... like home.  The pedals Clip-less are relatively easy to change and probably help avoid lateral falls (you know, those falls caused by hard to de-clip pedals).
     Important Note:  If you got the trouble to take your pedals, you can also take with you your shoes (what about gloves, eyewear.. put it all inside your helmet ...ahhh somebody said jerseys... shorts????)


Tip 7:  What to do to increase the life of both transmissions?  New   [click here]
 


 
     It's a good idea to storage your bike with both transmissions in the smallest ring.  In other words... the front transmission in the smallest chain ring and the rear transmission in the highest speed (smallest) ring in the cassette.  The springs of both transmissions will be in their lowest state of tension when not in use.   If you are really lucky and use your bike 8 hours a week that leaves 160 hours of storage time.   Its better to keep those transmissions in their lower tension state!




Trick 1:  The chain fell over the bottom bracket!  How to put it back in while riding!   [click here]
 


 
     No, is not a magician act, and yes it works!  At least I read in a couple of places that these MTbikers while in a race tried (and did) climb the chain back to the small chain ring.   They shift the front derailleur from the small to the middle chain ring while still moving the pedals.   I tried and it really works.  I tried dismounted and grabbing the bike by the seat post, shift and move the pedals with my hands!  I will never have my fingers dirty anymore.  Try it, I hope it works for you also!


 


Trick 2:  What to do for easier pedal clipping?   [click here]
 


 
    Just add some drops of a lubricant that contains Teflon (like Triflow) over the top surface of the pedals, is the one that make contact with the shoes (cleats).  Lubricate both sides of the pedal.  This makes them slip easily in the mechanism.  If you are new to Clip-less pedals, the benefit is also psychological!


 


Trick 3:  An alternative to spit/commercial liquids to improve HRM belt contact  [click here]
 


 
     Many cyclists use "spit" to improve the contact of their skin and their Heart Rate Monitor.  Something not too hygienic, may be Ok at first but after a couple of uses...  There is a cream commercially available, perhaps very similar to the one used in the EKG.  But what I do is to wear the belt before I leave, and after a few minutes the sweat improves the contact and activate the HRM transmitter.  The sweat is composed of water and electrolytes (salts) and conduce electrict current very well . 


 


Trick 4:  Benefits of a Tie-wrap in the fork tube.   [click here]
 


 
     Just place a tie-wrap in one of the fork tubes.  To avoid damaging the fork just add a couple of drops of lubricant .  Once the tie-wrap is well placed, move it to the bottom of the top tube.  It will work as a shock travel indicator.  It will also indicate the maximum travel of one of your outings.  
     To adjust the air volume in much of the forks it is necessary to check shock travel when a person sits on the bike.  Usually it's 20% of the total travel.  This low-tech indicator will work just fine.  Some rear shocks have an "O" ring for this purpose but not many of the forks!  The O-rings are softer than the tie wrap, but you have to disassemble the shock to install it ($$$$), so it's not a good idea.


 

 
Trick 5:  What to use for cleaning Hydraulic Brakes?  [click here]
 


 
     Shimano recommends Isopropyl alcohol.  Is the same you can buy in your drugstore as rubbing alcohol, just read the label!  This cleans very well the mineral oil, debris, dust and grease and doesn’t leave residuals.  The other advantage is that it dry very easy.  They suggest that you use a small spray bottle.  You can also clean the rotors with it!

 
 

  

   


 


 

   

© JGRR 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
Todos los derechos reservados.  Prohibido utilizar íconos, fotos, material multimedios, mapas e información provista sin la debida autorización del autor.

© JGRR 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 , 2010
All rights reserved.  Use of the photos, Icons, Multimedia Material, Maps and Information is forbidden without the written consent of the Author.



   

© JGRR 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
Todos los derechos reservados.  Prohibido utilizar íconos, fotos, material multimedios, mapas e información provista sin la debida autorización del autor.

© JGRR 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 , 2010
All rights reserved.  Use of the photos, Icons, Multimedia Material, Maps and Information is forbidden without the written consent of the Author.



   

© JGRR 2005 - 2014
Todos los derechos reservados.  Prohibido utilizar íconos, fotos, material multimedios, mapas e información provista sin la debida autorización del autor.

© JGRR 2005-2014
All rights reserved.  Use of the photos, Icons, Multimedia Material, Maps and Information is forbidden without the written consent of the Author.